The 8 Modules, 31 Focus Points and 5 Collaboration Phases of the SEIC Methodology provide a path to success

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Our Diagnostic Tool provides a gap analysis of SEI capability to support the strategic planning process

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In-depth explorations of the approaches and techniques used by leading organizations in the field of SEI today

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Thought leadership and insightful articles on the most important issues for companies pursuing an SEI agenda

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Insight calls are available to join for all members of the SEIC and will be addressing a number of topics

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Useful downloads, from unique research to practical templates, frameworks and tools being used by SEI leaders

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The 11 modules of the SEI methodology focus on the key processes that enable the successful rollout of SEI

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Our Capabilities Assessment tools provide the means for organizations to gain insight into their own SEI approach

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In-depth explorations of the approaches and techniques used by leading organizations in the field of SEI today

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Thought leadership and insightful articles on the most important issues for companies pursuing an SEI agenda

View

Useful downloads, from unique research to practical templates, frameworks and tools being used by SEI leaders

View

Accelerating supplier innovation

Our second Accelerator Program, held in London in early December, saw a cross-functional group of executives spend time developing their Supplier-Enabled Innovation plans

On 5 and 6 December k in London, members of the Supplier-Enabled Innovation Center (SEIC) were deeply absorbed in our latest Accelerator Program, an intensive workshop of collaborative learning and SEI-program development, chaired by John Paterson, former CPO of IBM.

 

Core to the whole process was our newly launched SEI Diagnostic tool, which provides a method for members to measure their SEI capabilities and plot their ambitions over a set time frame, so establishing the beginnings of a clear roadmap for progress, or, equally, helping to drive forward existing programs.

 

With a cross-industry mix of companies, with varying degrees of capability in their approach, the Accelerator Program provided a platform for participants to continue plotting their route to success, while sense-checking decisions already made.

 

The signs were encouraging. Each of the attending companies at this particular session (Bayer, Brose, Husqvarna, Merck, Osram and Philips) are firmly committed to the SEI vision. They have invested time, resource and intellectual capital in SEI, and hence are taking concrete steps to moving our profession into one that the entire business will view as crucial to their success.

 

We will publish a number of outputs from the two-day session between now and Christmas, but for now I’d like to share a couple of top-level thoughts from the event.

 

New business models just as important as new products

 

I had more than one conversation around how a formal SEI approach can facilitate the adoption of new business models, as much as the development of new products, processes and services. With so many industries under threat of disruption from non-traditional competitors, this trend is only set to grow. Indeed, for our latest member – Swiss Re – this was one of the key reasons for getting involved.

 

Product manufacturers are looking increasingly at software and services as potential value-adds to the end consumer, as much as widgets and hardware, in a similar move made by IBM over recent years. Naturally, this demands new approaches and new relationships beyond the existing ones already in place, and procurement must adapt in order to help facilitate this change.

 

Think how SEI can support strategic business goals

 

It was said on more than one occasion that SEI must not be viewed as a procurement initiative, neither by procurement itself or the wider business. By its nature, an SEI program can support and help realize wider corporate goals (reducing time to market, and therefore time to profit, as an example) by plugging into existing structures.

 

There is no point pursuing SEI as a separate initiative to corporate innovation, for example, it must align with it and bring suppliers into that process in a timely and structured fashion. SEI must be seen as a way to plug suppliers more formally and efficiently into wider company initiatives.

 

Our diagnostic provides those doing so with a tool to analyze capability, measure progress and stimulate action – and with plans to develop versions for other business stakeholders as well as the supply base – we’ll soon have a 360-degree view SEI.

 

And when those on similar journeys come together to debate, discuss and work collaboratively on their roadmaps, using common terminology and a common benchmark for reference, real value and momentum can be built.

 

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