The 8 Modules, 31 Focus Points and 5 Collaboration Phases of the SEIC Methodology provide a path to success

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Our Diagnostic Tool provides a gap analysis of SEI capability to support the strategic planning process

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In-depth explorations of the approaches and techniques used by leading organizations in the field of SEI today

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Insight calls are available to join for all members of the SEIC and will be addressing a number of topics

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The 11 modules of the SEI methodology focus on the key processes that enable the successful rollout of SEI

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Our Capabilities Assessment tools provide the means for organizations to gain insight into their own SEI approach

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In-depth explorations of the approaches and techniques used by leading organizations in the field of SEI today

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Thought leadership and insightful articles on the most important issues for companies pursuing an SEI agenda

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Useful downloads, from unique research to practical templates, frameworks and tools being used by SEI leaders

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China’s Mobike: innovation and collaboration disrupts a market

The technology inside the rapidly expanding bike-sharing app Mobike is breaking ground in its use of the Internet of Things – and collaboration is a key part of its success

Just a month after launching in Manchester, Mobike has announced the expansion of its bike sharing scheme into the west London borough of Ealing. Starting with an initial trial of 750 bikes, the launch will build on the Chinese company’s first foray into a Western market, with the goal to eventually expand across the UK and beyond.

 

But while Mobike’s unique selling point is arguably simplicity – riders can locate and unlock bikes by phone and park them anywhere (within reason) – the technology behind its product is innovative in its use of the Internet of Things (IoT), and warrants a closer look.

 

Mobike boasts of having “one of the largest – and most complex – IoT networks anywhere in the world”, and it’s not difficult to see why. Unlike other bike-sharing schemes, Mobike can monitor the location and condition of its entire fleet of bikes – five million at the close of 2016 – and operate their locks remotely. The information they gather has led to the building of AI tools capable of tracking demand and identifying traffic patterns, thereby further enhancing Mobike’s service.

 

These innovations haven’t only come from Mobike, however. Although the Chinese company designed the bike, credit for its most recent technology advances can be chalked up to collaborations and co-developments with a broad range of firms.

 

This year alone has seen the striking of three key partnerships. A collaboration with Ericsson and China Mobile Group Shanghai resulted in new cellular IoT technology that improved Mobike’s tracking system, while in May a partnership with Qualcomm Technologies and China Mobile was announced to produce more innovative IoT technologies. Most recently, Mobike extended its partnership with digital security firm Gimalto to further develop its smart bike lock.

 

These collaborations are already making waves in the company’s native China. While no official figures are currently available, Mobike’s ubiquity in the country’s streets is expected to provide a massive boost to long-declining bike use. The company now operates in 99 Asian cities, and its popularity has even caused some bike manufacturers in China to focus exclusively on producing its shared bikes.

 

With the addition of London to its list of cities, the same market disruptions could soon envelop the UK. Mobike has recently partnered with Foxconn to double its bike production this year, with a target of creating a global supply chain that churns out 10 million bikes by the year-end. After Manchester and London’s trial-runs, a portion of those bikes are certain to land in the UK and other European markets.

 

It’s a story that illustrates the powerful influence that collaboration can have on a market. Mobike was founded only two years ago in 2015, and yet is already dictating the pace of China’s cycling industry. The same result almost certainly wouldn’t have been reached had it tried to take the market on alone.

 

There’s every chance that Mobike and its partners will emulate their success in a host of other markets, serving as a visual reminder in the cities it sweeps through that, by effectively utilizing new technology and collaborating with the right companies, the direction of an old industry can be completely changed.

 

To learn more about Supplier-Enabled Innovation, please register to attend our invitation-only SRM & Innovation Summit on 27 September 2017.

 

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