The 8 Modules, 31 Focus Points and 5 Collaboration Phases of the SEIC Methodology provide a path to success

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Our Diagnostic Tool provides a gap analysis of SEI capability to support the strategic planning process

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In-depth explorations of the approaches and techniques used by leading organizations in the field of SEI today

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Thought leadership and insightful articles on the most important issues for companies pursuing an SEI agenda

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Insight calls are available to join for all members of the SEIC and will be addressing a number of topics

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Useful downloads, from unique research to practical templates, frameworks and tools being used by SEI leaders

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The 11 modules of the SEI methodology focus on the key processes that enable the successful rollout of SEI

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Our Capabilities Assessment tools provide the means for organizations to gain insight into their own SEI approach

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In-depth explorations of the approaches and techniques used by leading organizations in the field of SEI today

View

Thought leadership and insightful articles on the most important issues for companies pursuing an SEI agenda

View

Useful downloads, from unique research to practical templates, frameworks and tools being used by SEI leaders

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Insights from the SEIC Diagnostic

Data from our SEIC Diagnostic tool suggests some of the key areas of focus required by those looking to succeed in SEI include overall strategy, metrics and governance 

Insights from the SEIC Diagnostic

 

The SEIC Diagnostic tool provides members of the Supplier-Enabled Innovation Center with the means to assess their current capabilities in terms of SEI, with its eight modules and 31 focus points providing a landscape for in-depth analysis and a starting point for strategic planning.

 

And looking at the aggregated results of the data so far collected offers an interesting insight into those companies that place a strategic priority on supplier innovation.

 

A collaborative journey

 

The first thing to note, perhaps not surprisingly, is that the highest scoring element of the results comes with the ‘corporate need for SEI’. This shouldn’t be confused with a corporate need for innovation, but is a specific acceptance that the supply base can and must be a ‘crucial contributor’ to innovation.

 

On average, our members score this highest out of all the focus points in the Diagnostic and, similarly, they are ambitious in taking things even further; moving from a situation where the supply base is involved to a situation where there is ‘business-wide’ conviction that the supply base has critical capabilities for realizing corporate goals.

 

This is a crucial step on the journey towards successful SEI, as I’ve often noted. Procurement can’t make this journey alone – it can only succeed with the buy-in, support and belief of key business stakeholders.

 

Governance, cross-functional engagement & metrics are key areas

 

The biggest gaps between the current status and average ambition of our members comes in the areas mentioned above, and, again, illustrates some of the building blocks that require the most amount of work in the eyes of the SEIC community.

 

First, governance points to the inherent systems and processes put in place to drive SEI; from the use of strategic sourcing, category management and SRM to ensuring the involvement of relevant suppliers in all stages of the innovation process. Second, cross-functional engagement allows this to happen and the data suggests that our members have a significant ambition to move from a situation where procurement is involved on an ‘ad-hoc’ or ‘operational’ basis to one where they and SEI activities are included on an end-to-end and strategic basis.

 

Meanwhile, members naturally want to measure the success of what they are doing.

 

A strategic approach & systems are key

 

Looking at the data at a high level, a couple of hotspots emerge where organizations must focus if they are to make significant progress in SEI, with the first being in the need for a strategic, rather than tactical, approach to SEI.

 

There is a lot of work required to put in place annual SEI plans, governance models, the relevant structures and functions and with improving general corporate culture to embrace the concept of SEI more fully.

 

At the same time, the types of systems that can enable some of these priorities, such as knowledge management, technology, appropriate planning and reporting and metrics and monitoring (some of which are also mentioned above) need attention, being further behind some of the other areas highlighted by our Methodology.

 

The ultimate goal of any SEI program is to open the doors of a company to third-party innovation and to gain greater access to the R&D investments of suppliers, in a systemic way. Completing our Diagnostic is step one. Step two is to use our planning templates, tools, content and the power of a highly engaged community to help close gaps between current status and future ambition, and in so doing to embed SEI into the psyche of their organizations.

 

David Rae

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